Seattle - The Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 continues to frustrate operators of the Boeing 787-9. Several aircraft from the different airlines are currently out of service and waiting for replacement engines.

The quality issues with the Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 have reached a greater level than previously thought. All 787-9s with Trent 1000 engines are affected.

All Rolls-Royce operators in the fleet have experienced more or less severe wear on the Rolls-Royce engines,
said to Flightglobal 787 chief engineer Bob Whittington.
Boeing works closely with Rolls-Royce on a permanent solution,
he added.

Air New Zealand was double-hit in December 2017. Two 787-9 scheduled flights to Tokyo and Buenos Aires had to return to Auckland with a faulty Trent 1000 shortly after take-off. ANA, British Airways and Virgin Atlantic also reported incidents.

So far up to 500 engines are affected and requires immediate solution.

According to Rolls-Royce, the shortened service life of the engines results in a tense supply situation. Operators sometimes have to wait several months for replacement engines and park their 787-9s. Virgin Atlantic plans to lease up to four Airbus A330-200s from March 2018 onwards.

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) ordered a so-called "de-pairing" for some Trent 1000s last December.

Inspection intervals have been shortened, and certain engines may no longer be installed together on an aircraft for safety reasons to minimize the risk of a bilateral engine failure, EASA justified the issued urgent airworthiness directive.

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