Stockholm - Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) follows a phase-out program for all the Boeing 737 aircraft in its fleet. Within five years, the Nordic carrier will be an all-Airbus operator.

In mid-September, another B737-600 registered LN-RPE left the fleet. Now there are only eight aircraft of the same type with the SAS. The remaining eight aircraft are scheduled to leave the fleet by the end of next year.

In addition to 737-600s, the airline also has more than 50 Boeing 737 from the 700 and 800 series. There is an ongoing settlement plan for those aircraft as well. Each month, one device from the 700 / 800 series leaves the fleet. Thus, the Swedish airline plans to have an all-Airbus fleet by 2023.

The 737-600 (LN-RPE), which was recently removed from the fleet, has been transformed into spare parts in the UK for exclusively US domestic operators.

Ryanair bought three 737-600 that we returned to a lessor before, and they use these planes for pilot training in Scotland,
said Niklas Hårdänge, the head of SAS Fleet Management.

The termination of flight operations does not reduce the value of the aircraft. On the contrary, most of the parts, especially the engines are hotly demanded by other airlines and leasing companies.

Most parts of the 737-600s are reusable on the other NG models. The climate in northern Europe with cold temperatures and relatively high humidity is also a good environment, so the aircraft and engines are in good condition,
Hårdänge added.

When LN-RPE and the other 737-600s are dismantled, about 500-600 parts are picked up for resale. Even the aluminum body is melted down and recycled.

Boeing 737-600 made its first flight in 1998. Boeing produced only 69 copies for SAS, the only customer of the model. The idea was to operate relatively a small aircraft with 123 seats. They replaced the DC 9s on the Norwegian domestic network.

Today several airlines operate the 737-600s in their fleets such as Canadian WestJet and the US Janet Air.