Seattle - After a ten months flight test campaign the Boeing 787-10 was declared eligible for commercial service by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

On January 22, Boeing announced that it had obtained the type certificate for 787-10 from the FAA, the longest variant of the Dreamliner family. The American aircraft manufacturer expects other authorities to certify the aircraft before entry into service. The first delivery is planned in the first half of 2018 for Singapore Airlines.

The certification came with a flight test campaign that began on March 31, 2017. Three prototypes of the 787-10 participated in the test campaign, which have accumulated 900 hours of tests.

The 787-10 shares 95% of its elements with the 787-9 of which it is the extended version. (5.5 meters longer). It can carry 330 passengers with the standard two-class configuration, compared to 290 for the 787-9. Like the latter, the 787-10 is powered by either the Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 or GEnx engines.

Autonomy is more limited than 787-9 - 6042 NM (11,910 km) instead of 7635 NM (14,140 km). However, Boeing ensures that this range is sufficient for 90% of the long-haul routes in the world currently
operated by twin engines.

To date, the 787-10 records 171 orders from nine customers:

  • Air France-KLM: 8 (GE engines),
  • Air Lease Corporation: 25 (including ten confirmed with GE engines),
  • All Nippon Airways: 3 (Rolls Royce),
  • British Airways: 12 (Rolls Royce),
  • Etihad Airways: 30 (GE),
  • EVA Air: 18 (GE),
  • GECAS: 4 (GE),
  • Singapore Airlines: 49 (Rolls Royce)
  • United Airlines: 14 (GE),
  • Unidentified Client: 8 (GE)

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