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Boeing 777X test incident to have no major consequences

Seattle, Washington - Boeing does not expect that the incident during a test with the 777X static aircraft will have major consequences.

During the so-called final payload test, a cargo door blew out of the hull last week, after which the test was stopped.

Boeing is still investigating the cause of the incident, however, the manufacturer doesn't predict a delay in the program.

The manufacturer said the incident occurred in the final minutes of the test, during which decompression of the rear body was performed. According to Boeing, 99% of the final payload test had already been exercised at the time of the blowout.

Also read: Door blows out during final payload testing

Among other things, the wings of the aircraft were bent upwards due to the blast.

Final load tests are performed to determine the loads and stresses beyond normal operational loads. The forces that the test aircraft was exposed are considerably higher than an aircraft will meet during normal service.

Although the investigation continues and will take a few more weeks, Boeing does not expect the incident to have a significant impact on the certification schedule. The company emphasizes that safety has the highest priority.

Boeing began the ground tests with the 777X static aircraft in June. The aircraft is produced for ground testing only an will never fly.



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